Fiction, Non-Fiction and Facts

  BBC Radio Four offers a number of fine programmes about books, writing and reading. I regularly enjoy A Good Read in which the host and two guests each specify a book that all three have to read and then comment on. It is a great antidote to anyone who doubts that literary taste is entirely subjective. […]

Continue reading →

Teaching Dissent

thanks to Jennifer Murawski for the photo When you look at the long history of man, you see that more hideous crimes have been committed in the name of obedience than have been committed in the name of rebellion. CP Snow For too many teachers in too many schools around the world, the ideal student […]

Continue reading →

What every teacher knows instinctively…

…that teaching is not just complex, it is very complex! Teaching involves many tangibles, but far more intangibles. There is just so much in the whole complex edifice of teaching and learning that is ineffable, that simply beggars simplistic description. And yet, the schools system is held captive at the present time, in most countries […]

Continue reading →

Teacher-Student Relationship

David Brooks, in his popular book, The Social Animal, expounds on education, and has a few interesting things to say, mainly in the American context (although undoubtedly with meaningful echoes elsewhere). For instance: For 30 years I’ve been covering school reform and we’ve basically reorganised the bureaucratic boxes — charters, private schools, vouchers — but […]

Continue reading →