Teaching Dissent

thanks to Jennifer Murawski for the photo When you look at the long history of man, you see that more hideous crimes have been committed in the name of obedience than have been committed in the name of rebellion. CP Snow For too many teachers in too many schools around the world, the ideal student […]

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Hyperbole and Bad Faith

Each new week brings with it the publication of yet another book telling us how technological developments will damage, or are already damaging, humankind. We are becoming more stupid and less sociable; we are abandoning literature and we are eroding our attention span; we are sabotaging our privacy and we are relinquishing our right to […]

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The Learning Society: social and economic progress through education

The printing press sowed the seeds of social and economic progress, heralding a time when ‘change itself [became] the archetypal norm of social life’ (McLuhan). It then took another three centuries and more before the philosophers of the Scottish Enlightenment were able to reframe the concept of progress as no longer merely change-as-happenstance but rather as a conscious effort to transform society for the […]

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Reading in the Mobile Era

I have been reading through the findings of a great report published earlier this year by UNESCO: Reading in the Mobile Era. I am working on a longer post on mobile learning more generally, which I will publish in the next day or two, but I want to promote this report and offer its own summary […]

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Schooling: “the pyramid of classified packages”

Schools are designed on the assumption that there is a secret to everything in life; that the quality of life depends on knowing that secret; that secrets can be known only in orderly successions; and that only teachers can properly reveal these secrets. An individual with a schooled mind conceives of the world as a pyramid of classified packages accessible […]

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How does the world produce all the teachers it needs?

Professor Bob Moon, Professor of Education at The Open University in the UK,  penned a piece in 2010 for the Commonwealth of Learning site entitled: Time for Radical Change in Teacher Education. Professor Moon is also a founding Director of the Teacher Education in Sub-Saharan Africa (TESSA) programmme, a superb repository for teacher training resources in English, Arabic […]

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