The Guardian Takes Sugata Mitra to Task…

…..and gets it completely wrong! Peter Wilby, whose Guardian writings on education I usually have some respect for, seems to fall heavily into the trap of believing that right can only be distinguished from wrong in education through academic research. On Sugata Mitra and his work (the Hole in the Wall Project and now his School in […]

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Post Literacy Post-Haste

Anxiety sells! So says The Economist this week in an excellent piece showing just how long we have had to listen to the oft-heard announcements of the terminal decline of written English…..since at least 1387! In that year, Ranulph Higden, a Benedictine monk bemoaned the influx of words from Norman French, Anglo-Saxon and Danish. We know today that it […]

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Reading in the Mobile Era

I have been reading through the findings of a great report published earlier this year by UNESCO: Reading in the Mobile Era. I am working on a longer post on mobile learning more generally, which I will publish in the next day or two, but I want to promote this report and offer its own summary […]

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Teacher Education in the Developing World

A philanthropic trust based here in Edinburgh has asked me to undertake a short term research project and feasibility study to examine: the challenges currently facing teacher education in the developing world, and; the potential for developing an open cloud-based platform for learning – CommonLearn – that will serve the varied purposes of teacher-educators, teachers […]

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What every teacher knows instinctively…

…that teaching is not just complex, it is very complex! Teaching involves many tangibles, but far more intangibles. There is just so much in the whole complex edifice of teaching and learning that is ineffable, that simply beggars simplistic description. And yet, the schools system is held captive at the present time, in most countries […]

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The Dictatorship of No Alternative

‘The dictatorship of no alternative’ is a phrase used by Brazilian social and political commentator (and politician) Roberto Mangabeira Unger. He argues that, too often, those who offer alternatives to the status quo are dismissed either as utopian or trivial. Ideas will be rejected as utopian if they are too distant from the established order; […]

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Money for Antique Rope

Here is the rub. Reading 90 per cent of academic tomes is worse than eating a cardboard sandwich: disgusting to look at and impossible to chew. Decent style and a flowing sentence is sacrificed for the tedium of the researcher’s “thesis”. Many academics seem not to have got over writing their doctorates — their typescripts […]

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