Values for Today’s Education

We want one class of persons to have a liberal education. We want another class of persons, a very much larger class of necessity, to forego the privileges of a liberal education and fit themselves to perform specific difficult manual tasks. So said Woodrow Wilson in 1909 to a group of trainee teachers, when he […]

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Education Without Borders: Syria’s Children

Malala Yousafzai – Portrait by Jonathan Yeo The mission of A World at School is: We: make noise for education, asking leaders to raise budgets, build schools, train teachers and improve learning – and we use your voice to do this move governments and policy makers to action by providing them with concrete data and action plans, and by exposing them to […]

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The Flapping Windmill

[This was the paper that wrote in support of The Doctor Laurel Anne Clyde Memorial Address which I gave to ASLA in Adelaide in 2008. It re-visited a number of themes I have explored in my writing on this blog and elsewhere)   Almost forty years ago, RF Mackenzie, the radical Scottish educationist, was able to write: […]

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Bob Mackenzie aka RF Mackenzie

I have been delving back into the words and deeds of some of those educators who first convinced me there was more to education than schooling and more to schooling than transmission of information. One of my heroes in education was Bob Mackenzie – or RF Mackenzie to give him his Sunday name. He taught […]

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Knowable Networked Communities

Raymond Williams, in The Country and the City, pondered the change in attitudes in English society, as portrayed in the literature of that country produced between the 16th and 19th centuries, brought about by the related processes of industrialisation and urbanisation, by the inexorable shift from country to city. In a chapter entitled Knowable Communities, […]

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Education Fast Forward: from learner voice to emerging leaders

Almost everyone involved in education agrees that leadership is important. That, however, is where agreement ends and debate begins. Beyond that point, we cross a turbulent landscape where competing definitions of leadership abound, where the very nature of leadership is the stuff of argument, where conflicting philosophies of education each generate their own understanding of […]

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